Tag - Definition

Color Wheel with words on top that read the language of color

Basic Color Terms Defined

Like any discipline, color has a language. To work with color confidently, it is helpful to learn that language. Thankfully, it’s not complicated. Knowing a handful of basic color terms is all you need to understand what people are saying about color. A firm understanding of these terms will help in both working with color and communicating about color with other people, such as designers and printers. First, there are two ways to create color. Additive Color MixingAdditive color mixing refers...

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Photo in background of woman typing on a laptop, text reads vector vs. raster

Vector vs. Raster. What’s the Difference?

When designing digitally, there are two main types of image files designers work with: vector and raster. For any designer working digitally, deciding between vector vs. raster first considers how the files will be used. But first, what's the difference? Vector vs. Raster Vector According to Adobe, "Vector files are images that are built by mathematical formulas that establish points on a grid." These images can adjust in size infinitely without losing resolution. This ability makes them very versatile for certain...

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What is a Harlequin

What is a Harlequin Pattern?

Diamonds are a popular motif in textile design. As a result, there are a lot of different terms textile designers use to describe the different types of diamond designs they create. As you search our licensable library, you'll see in the Theme search menu an option to view Harlequin. What exactly does that mean? Textile designers use the term harlequin to describe a diamond pattern with elongated shapes arranged vertically. They are point to point, sometimes very close together,...

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What is a Stripe?

Stripes truly are one of the most ubiquitous types of patterns. From the minute humans decided to make their everyday items look more decorative, they have been using stripes. While some people hear the word stripe and think of solid lines of color lined up next to each other, a stripe can be more more than that. The term itself refers to any type of motif lined up next to each other, not just solid blocks of color. Stripe...

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What is a Greek Key?

The Greek Key is a common motif in textile design and many other places where decorative elements are necessary. Whether or not you know the name, you have most likely seen a Greek Key design. In fact, it may even be in your home. Often used as a border, it is also used frequently in stripes. It is so versatile; it even appears on its own in allover patterns. Though it is referred to as a Greek Key, this distinct...

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Plaid Pattern Definition and Design

According to the classic book Textile Designs by Susan Meller and Joost Elffers, "the plaid is a box layout of stripes, usually horizontal and vertical, and almost always crossing at right angles. The simple definition is scarcely very descriptive, but plaids have been produced in such vast variety since the beginning of modern textile printing that a more searching definition might not cover them all. Their origin is in the threads of the loom, the warp set up lengthwise...

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Polka Dot Blog Pattern P31

Polka Dot Definition and Designs

It is safe to assume, that nearly everyone has had a polka dot pattern in their clothes or linen closet at some point in their life. It seems from the first time this pattern made an appearance, it has always been on trend in one form or another. Polka dots are fairly recent in the scope of textile history. Medieval Europeans had no interest in dots. Without machines promising perfectly spaced dots, irregularly spaced dots were too reminiscent of diseases...

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Damask Blog Pattern P592
Damask Blog Pattern P376

Damask Definition and Designs

Damask textiles originated in China around 300BC. The knowledge of this weaving technique slowly spread west from there. They are named after the significant silk road trading city Damascus, Syria. These finely patterned textiles grew to major production in the Middle Ages, particularly in the Middle East. Legend often credits Marco Polo with bringing the first damask to Venice in 1295 as part of a fabric bundle. Whether true or apocryphal, Europeans were instantly taken by their richness and...

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